Six Impossible Things


“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed in as many as six impossible things before breakfast…”

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thoughts while reading “Joy of Cooking”

1.  Why do I always choose to look at this cookbook?  The illustrations make culinary feats which are quite probably impossible look ridiculously easy thereby making me feel like an epic failure when I cannot, for example, hold a hot cake in one hand while coating the sides of it with chopped nuts. (confession: I selected this example because I haven’t experienced that specific humiliation… yet)

2. Why does my Grandmother want a chocolate cake for her birthday? It’s just going to cause me to over-complicate something simple.

3. Perhaps I am not ready to tackle the “mild, light chocolate cake known as the “Rombauer Special” which first appeared in the 1931 edition of JOY” if I’m mentally preparing my alternate chocolate cake (you know, the one I’ll whip up at a moment’s notice if this one goes to hell in a hand basket) while reading through the recipe.

4. I concur with the following : “Butter cakes are the glory of the American cake repertoire.  For flavor and texture, butter is our strong preference, as it has been for generations of bakers..”

Proof I’ve seen “Gone With The Wind” too many times: scarred to the point of phobia by the scene when, whilst packing to flee Atlanta before General Sherman arrives, Prissy closes Scarlett’s hope chest breaking all of the china inside; I am only able to fill Grandma’s with my ever growing collection of 70’s hued Tupperware and vintage linens.

Proof I’ve seen “Gone With The Wind” too many times: scarred to the point of phobia by the scene when, whilst packing to flee Atlanta before General Sherman arrives, Prissy closes Scarlett’s hope chest breaking all of the china inside; I am only able to fill Grandma’s with my ever growing collection of 70’s hued Tupperware and vintage linens.

Tonight’s agenda: Making skull potholders with Blanche DuBois whilst watching a JFK documentary.

Tonight’s agenda: Making skull potholders with Blanche DuBois whilst watching a JFK documentary.

chattinwithtatton:

Oh so grand


Love this.

chattinwithtatton:

Oh so grand

Love this.

Source: chattinwithtatton

Source: booksandstories

Here I am.  Immediately after my birthday shot on my 24th birthday and immediately prior to seeing “The Goonies” at midnight that same night.  It’s showing again tonight at The Inwood.  Boyfriend and I will be in attendance because Goonies never say die.
worthy of visit: the inwood theatre

Here I am.  Immediately after my birthday shot on my 24th birthday and immediately prior to seeing “The Goonies” at midnight that same night.  It’s showing again tonight at The Inwood.  Boyfriend and I will be in attendance because Goonies never say die.

worthy of visit: the inwood theatre

"I like Revelations, and the book of Daniel, and Genesis and Samuel, and a little bit of Exodus, and some parts of Kings and Chronicles, and Job and Jonah." "And the Psalms? I hope you like them?" "No, sir." "No? Oh, shocking! I have a little boy, younger than you, who knows six Psalms by heart: and when you ask him which he would rather have, a gingerbread-nut to eat, or a verse of a Psalm to learn he says: ‘Oh! The verse of a Psalm! angels sing Psalms,’ says he; ‘I wish to be an angel here below;’ he then gets two nuts in recompense for his infant piety." "Psalms are not interesting I remarked.

taken from: Jane Eyre by: Charlotte Bronte, chapter IV

Bedfellows: Jane Eyre, Blanche DuBois, & I

Bedfellows: Jane Eyre, Blanche DuBois, & I

Happy Saint Patricks Day!
extranuance:

Angela Greene (1946)

Happy Saint Patricks Day!

extranuance:

Angela Greene (1946)

Source: viciouslyvivacious

on using vintage tupperware for therapy.

I work regularly with my grandma now on color, shape, and pattern recognition.  It’s a battle I’ll ultimately lose but I want her to remain as mentally agile as she can for as long as she can.  Tonight she carefully unstacked my vintage Tupperware luncheon set, matched the cups with their plates, and the saucers that double as lids with each cup.  Then she stacked them all back up keeping the saucers, cups, and plates in the same pattern. This sounds simple but it took over 30 minutes for her to complete the task.  Then we talked about what she thought I could use these little gems for and how often she thought I’d use them.  If you’re curious Grandma recommends serving peanut butter sandwiches and celery for lunch with milk.

It’s a therapy of sorts for me too.  I know she won’t be here forever and it makes me sad that I won’t be able to have her over to my house to eat lunch on my silly little luncheon sets.  To cope with all of those emotions and get a jump start on dealing with what I know will be a long grieving process she and I have been filling her hope chest with things for my future home.  This luncheon set included. 

So one day, years form now, when I get out these autumn harvest wonders from the late 70’s I’ll remember how happy my Grandma was to see them, touch them, and put them in her cedar hope chest for me.

I love this lady - if I am half of the lady she is I’ll count myself a tremendous success.